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crisis in my country

Sunday, January 25, 2004

My name is Adam M.Ibn Chambas, I am a young man of twenty five years of age I come from northern region of Ghana and i work at busyinternet accra ghana
I want to write history of my hometown. Dagbon and its People

DAGOMBA (better pronounced as DAGBAMBA) speak Dagbani (better pronounced as Dagbanli). The language belongs to the More-Dagbanli sub-group of Gur languages. The More or Moshi now have their homeland in present day Burkina Faso, while the Dagbanli sub-group today has broken up into three ethnic groups: The Dagbamba, the Mamprusi and the Nanumba. Even though these groups today constitute three apparently distinct ethnic groups, their people still identify with each other and the bond is strongest among the Dagbamba and Nanumba. The homeland of the Dagbamba is called Dagbon and covers about 8,000 sq. miles in area and has a total population of about 650, 000. The area constitutes seven administrative districts in present day Ghana. These are Tamale Municipality, Tolon/Kumbungu, Savelugu/Nantong, Yendi, Gushegu/Karaga, Zabzugu/Tatali and Saboba/Cheriponi. The overlord the Dagbon Traditional Kingdom is the Ya- Na, whose court and administrative capital is at Yendi. Yendi is ! reputed to be the largest village in West Africa. The Dagbon Kingdom has traditional administrative responsibilities for hitherto acephalous groups like the Konkomba, the Bimoba, the Chekosi, the Basaari, the Chamba, and the Zantasi. Though ethnic Dagbamba are in the majority, the people of the subject ethnic groups have equal citizenship rights in the Kingdom. The seat of the Ya Na literally translated as King of Absolute Power, is a collection of cow skins. Thus when we talk of the political history of Dagbon, we often refer to it as the Yendi Skin. (Not throne or crown).

Na Gbewaa is regarded as the founder of Greater Dagbon (Present day Dagbon, Mamprugu and Nanung). Lacking in a writing culture, Dagbamba are one of the cultural groups with a very sophisticated oral culture woven around drums and other musical instruments. Thus most of its history, until quite recently, has been based on oral tradition with drummers as professional historians. So according to oral tradition, the political history of Dagbon has its genesis in the lifestory of a legend called Tohazie (translated as Red Hunter.).

Culturally, Dagbon is heavily influence by Islam. Inheretance is patrilineal. Prominent festival they celebrate include the Damba, Bugum (fire festival) and the two Islamic Eid Festivals. The most cosmopolitan city of Dagbon is Tamale, which also serves as the Northern Regional capital.


ETHNIC GROUPS IN MY COUNTRY GHANA

In 1960 roughly 100 linguistic and cultural groups were recorded in Ghana. Although later censuses placed less emphasis on the ethnic and cultural composition of the population, differences of course existed and had not disappeared by the mid-1990s The major ethnic groups in Ghana include the Akan, Ewe, Mole-Dagbane, Guan, and Ga-Adangbe. The subdivisions of each group share a common cultural heritage, history, language, and origin. These shared attributes were among the variables that contributed to state formation in the precolonial period. Competition to acquire land for cultivation, to control trade routes, or to form alliances for protection also promoted group solidarity and state formation. The creation of the union that became the Asante confederacy in the late seventeenth century is a good example of such processes at work in Ghana's past.
Ethnic rivalries of the precolonial era, variance in the impact of colonialism upon different regions of the country, and the uneven distribution of social and economic amenities in postindependence Ghana have all contributed to present-day ethnic tensions. For example, in February 1994, more than 1,000 persons were killed and 150,000 others displaced in the northeastern part of Ghana in fighting between Konkomba on one side and Nanumba, Dagomba, and Gonja on the other. The clashes resulted from longstanding grievances over land ownership and the prerogatives of chiefs. A military task force restored order, but a state of emergency in the region remained in force until mid-August.

Although this violence was certainly evidence of ethnic tension in the country, most observers agreed that the case in point was exceptional. As one prolific writer on modern Ghana, Naomi Chazan, has aptly observed, undifferentiated recourse to ethnic categories has obscured the essential fluidity that lies at the core of shared ties in the country. Evidence of this fluidity lies in the heterogeneous nature of all administrative regions, in rural-urban migration that results in interethnic mixing, in the shared concerns of professionals and trade unionists that cut across ethnic lines, and in the multi-ethnic composition of secondary school and university classes. Ethnicity, nonetheless, continues to be one of the most potent factors affecting political behavior in Ghana. For this reason, ethnically based political parties are unconstitutional under the present Fourth Republic.

Despite the cultural differences among Ghana's various peoples, linguists have placed Ghanaian languages in one or the other of only two major linguistic subfamilies of the Niger-Congo language family, one of the large language groups in Africa. These are the Kwa and Gur groups, found to the south and north of the Volta River, respectively. The Kwa group, which comprises about 75 percent of the country's population, includes the Akan, Ga-Adangbe, and Ewe. The Akan are further divided into the Asante, Fante, Akwapim, Akyem, Akwamu, Ahanta, Bono, Nzema, Kwahu, and Safwi. The Ga-Adangbe people and language group include the Ga, Adangbe, Ada, and Krobo or Kloli. Even the Ewe, who constitute a single linguistic group, are divided into the Nkonya, Tafi, Logba, Sontrokofi, Lolobi, and Likpe1. North of the Volta River are the three subdivisions of the Gur-speaking people. These are the Gurma, Grusi, and Mole-Dagbane. Like the Kwa subfamilies, further divisions exist within the principal Gur groups.

Any one group may be distinguished from others in the same linguistically defined category or subcategory, even when the members of the category are characterized by essentially the same social institutions. Each has a historical tradition of group identity, if nothingelse, and, usually, of political autonomy. In some cases, however, what is considered a single unit for census and other purposes may have been divided into identifiable separate groups before and during much of the colonial period and, in some manner, may have continued to be separate after independence.

No part of Ghana, however, is ethnically homogeneous. Urban centers are the most ethnically mixed because of migration to towns and cities by those in search of employment. Rural areas, with the exception of cocoa-producing areas that have attracted migrant labor, tend to reflect more traditional population distributions. One overriding feature of the country's ethnic population is that groups to the south who are closer to the Atlantic coast have long been influenced by the money economy, Western education, and Christianity, whereas Gur-speakers to the north, who have been less exposed to those influences, have came under Islamic influence. These influences were not pervasive in the respective regions, however, nor were they wholly restricted to them.
MY NAME IS ADAM M.IBN CHAMBAS

ETHNIC GROUPS IN OUR COUNTRY GHANA

In 1960 roughly 100 linguistic and cultural groups were recorded in Ghana. Although later censuses placed less emphasis on the ethnic and cultural composition of the population, differences of course existed and had not disappeared by the mid-1990s The major ethnic groups in Ghana include the Akan, Ewe, Mole-Dagbane, Guan, and Ga-Adangbe. The subdivisions of each group share a common cultural heritage, history, language, and origin. These shared attributes were among the variables that contributed to state formation in the precolonial period. Competition to acquire land for cultivation, to control trade routes, or to form alliances for protection also promoted group solidarity and state formation. The creation of the union that became the Asante confederacy in the late seventeenth century is a good example of such processes at work in Ghana's past.
Ethnic rivalries of the precolonial era, variance in the impact of colonialism upon different regions of the country, and the uneven distribution of social and economic amenities in postindependence Ghana have all contributed to present-day ethnic tensions. For example, in February 1994, more than 1,000 persons were killed and 150,000 others displaced in the northeastern part of Ghana in fighting between Konkomba on one side and Nanumba, Dagomba, and Gonja on the other. The clashes resulted from longstanding grievances over land ownership and the prerogatives of chiefs. A military task force restored order, but a state of emergency in the region remained in force until mid-August.

Although this violence was certainly evidence of ethnic tension in the country, most observers agreed that the case in point was exceptional. As one prolific writer on modern Ghana, Naomi Chazan, has aptly observed, undifferentiated recourse to ethnic categories has obscured the essential fluidity that lies at the core of shared ties in the country. Evidence of this fluidity lies in the heterogeneous nature of all administrative regions, in rural-urban migration that results in interethnic mixing, in the shared concerns of professionals and trade unionists that cut across ethnic lines, and in the multi-ethnic composition of secondary school and university classes. Ethnicity, nonetheless, continues to be one of the most potent factors affecting political behavior in Ghana. For this reason, ethnically based political parties are unconstitutional under the present Fourth Republic.

Despite the cultural differences among Ghana's various peoples, linguists have placed Ghanaian languages in one or the other of only two major linguistic subfamilies of the Niger-Congo language family, one of the large language groups in Africa. These are the Kwa and Gur groups, found to the south and north of the Volta River, respectively. The Kwa group, which comprises about 75 percent of the country's population, includes the Akan, Ga-Adangbe, and Ewe. The Akan are further divided into the Asante, Fante, Akwapim, Akyem, Akwamu, Ahanta, Bono, Nzema, Kwahu, and Safwi. The Ga-Adangbe people and language group include the Ga, Adangbe, Ada, and Krobo or Kloli. Even the Ewe, who constitute a single linguistic group, are divided into the Nkonya, Tafi, Logba, Sontrokofi, Lolobi, and Likpe1. North of the Volta River are the three subdivisions of the Gur-speaking people. These are the Gurma, Grusi, and Mole-Dagbane. Like the Kwa subfamilies, further divisions exist within the principal Gur groups.

Any one group may be distinguished from others in the same linguistically defined category or subcategory, even when the members of the category are characterized by essentially the same social institutions. Each has a historical tradition of group identity, if nothingelse, and, usually, of political autonomy. In some cases, however, what is considered a single unit for census and other purposes may have been divided into identifiable separate groups before and during much of the colonial period and, in some manner, may have continued to be separate after independence.

No part of Ghana, however, is ethnically homogeneous. Urban centers are the most ethnically mixed because of migration to towns and cities by those in search of employment. Rural areas, with the exception of cocoa-producing areas that have attracted migrant labor, tend to reflect more traditional population distributions. One overriding feature of the country's ethnic population is that groups to the south who are closer to the Atlantic coast have long been influenced by the money economy, Western education, and Christianity, whereas Gur-speakers to the north, who have been less exposed to those influences, have came under Islamic influence. These influences were not pervasive in the respective regions, however, nor were they wholly restricted to them.

POSTED BY ADAM M.IBN CHAMBAS


Saturday, January 24, 2004

Friday, January 23, 2004

Fri Jan 23, 08:54:26 AM . adam chambas EDIT DELETE


Accra crisis,stories,news,jokes and health stories.
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01/01/2004 - 01/31/2004
This is our first time writting blog in Accra. Our mission is to bring you the latest news on the crisis,home stories,jokes amazing Ghana,and health storries. As time goes on we will includ more catergories on our websites. thanks to the lectures who brought me this lot of work. Ops! thanks to your wonderfull dream work and the great great blong team work. Its always a greatfully for me joining you with your dream work. Thanks for showing me the light of easy communication,its low cost forlks j

Friday, January 23, 2004Blog Readers, just stop for a second to wread this blog of my concern bassed on Real story.
Please be the best advicer for yourself and don't loss the world of your compititions .Your generations a going far miles away, toward their targets,their middle class-status. Please be awake to the distroyer of our home,properties,resposibilies,our farmily the world as large.

“ People will only realise there is a problem
when they start to see their friends and
colleagues dying of AIDS/HIV

Frank was the handsum guy in my gernerations and the women lover boy during our childhood.
He start to pratices unsafe sex when he was 7years old by then it was nothing to all off us but he become used to it and what he hate most in a women, was a women who always mention condom to him. He always said to the women, "just once". i know Frank,(kwesi) personally in kotobabi where we grew together and attended the same kotobabi 1-2 primary school. He is always on a guess to have sex with 1,000 women before he got married. His mom/dad,friends,teachers and colleage.His family even setup a pastors to pray for him on several occations that his own womanizing was a work of the evil to a distroction of his life.

As he is my best friend, i spoke to him saveral times about the risks and stuff but he doesn't want to listen and the worse in all that is the fact that he doesn't always us protection, he says that it kills the vibe and the sensation and... and the worst is the fact he is willing to sleep with any kind of women...and he always have a heart desire for every woman he saw...... so just to make the equation, if this guy is HIV positive then all the time he has one night stand he doesn't use protection he gives it to these women who doesn't know that they are infected and then go around and spread it to other one night standers, boyfriends, husband... and the worst of it all is that he doesn't wnat to go and be tested for AIDS/HIV. so no one knows what he is spreadind around in Kotobabi/Accra.
i think that it is easy to spread something like that Ghana since it is such a small country and one person can have a really bad chain reaction.
"Many west africa contries , One nigerian/south Africa"

I see HIV/AIDS and would like to blog to my brothers and sisters the world as large that HIV/AIDS is for real, its not just name named by the proffesional doctors or a common cold .

Folks, "stop this HIV/AIDS" this is a story of my friends who was inffected by the killer dease .
Frank, he died in his middle class-status.

Frank the most handsum guy i know in my generation.
(Based on Real story)

Thanks to the lectures who introduce me to thise wonderfull workshop. I'm going to let you hear
of me,cause you push me through u know.

Posted by: ADAM M.IBN CHAMBAS: / 17:25/ GMT
Friday, January 23, 2004 First of all i may like to say (Akwaaba) means welcome to everyone who read my story i publishing about some stories in my country.I wish people enjoy it. They are my favourit top stories. So i had want to take this oppotunity from bogger to spread and communicate this to my friends and families out everywhere,the world as large. Read my brogg and hear the the lastest crisis,stories,news,jokes,health going on in Accra,(Ghana). it maybe be funny sometimes,and sometimes sad,but don't worry its already a say that,"cry more,and laught a little" .
Well, the strandness,poverty, crisis in Africa sometimes make the youth and the unemployees find their self in a shamefull condition.
Folks. I'm Adam M.Ibn Chambas a worker at Busyinternet Accra Ghana bringing you more infor about the physical crisis and some sad news about all what's going on in my country ghana,(Accra). I can't write much, but i'm very good at a simple english just to make sure you understand, and call me the best writer. We can't write much but we wish to come out with something intresting and enjoyable to read please anyone visiting my site should correct me. thank you


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